Doctor Yourself

Monday, March 21, 2011

Fals in acte

Credeti ca numai in Romania, politicienii incarca facturile ? Ei bine, se intampla si in Rai ... Un nenesenator a falsificat facturile biroului sau, ca sa-si incarce facturile. A cheltuit 315.000 $ pe calatorii din anul 2007
http://www.vancouversun.com/news/Senator+found+guilty+fraud+breach+trust/4424569/story.html

"Lavigne, 65, recently came under fire for continuing to collect his paycheques and spending $315,355 in office and travel expenses since 2007 — despite being barred from attending Senate proceedings and committee hearings since the charges were laid."

 A mai cerut inca 12.365 $ pentru calatoriile angajatilor sai, care au fost platiti doar cu 2.700 $...

Lavigne "committed a false and dishonest act" when he requested $12,365.50 in expense claims for travel made by his former staffer, Michel Gendron, to whom he paid $2,700

Senator Raymond Lavigne was found not guilty of obstruction of justice.

Ontario Superior Court Judge Robert Smith ruled that Lavigne — a former Liberal MP for a Montreal-area riding, who was appointed to the Senate in 2002 — should have known better. Lavigne was expelled from the party's caucus when criminal charges were laid in 2007.
Wearing a black suit and burgundy tie, Lavigne was accompanied in court Friday by his wife and retired Liberal senator Michel Biron, a close friend.
Lavigne looked dismayed when the verdict was handed down. "I knew I would not get a fair and just trial," he told Postmedia News.
The senator faces a maximum sentence of 14 years in prison for fraud and five years for breach of trust.
Lavigne's lawyer, Dominique St-Laurent, said he and his client were evaluating very seriously the possibility of an appeal.
The Senate's committee on internal economy, budgets and administration moved swiftly Friday afternoon to suspend Lavigne's research and office-expense budget and to disable his BlackBerry, citing an emergency situation.
"This becomes effective immediately and is meant to safeguard the interests of the institution when the Senate is not sitting. The senator no longer has the right to the use of Senate resources for carrying out his parliamentary functions," senators David Tkachuk and George Furey wrote in a statement.
Lavigne, 65, recently came under fire for continuing to collect his paycheques and spending $315,355 in office and travel expenses since 2007 — despite being barred from attending Senate proceedings and committee hearings since the charges were laid.
The Senate will meet on March 21 to decide whether to wait for Lavigne's sentence — to be delivered on May 10 — or whether to cut his salary or even expel him from the Senate. That move would free up his seat so Prime Minister Stephen Harper can appoint a new Montreal-area senator.
According to the criminal code, if Lavigne is sentenced to more than two years, his seat will become vacant.
But the Senate will still have to meet to formally kick him out.
The judge said Lavigne "committed a false and dishonest act" when he requested $12,365.50 in expense claims for travel made by his former staffer, Michel Gendron, to whom he paid $2,700.
Smith said Gendron — who testified Lavigne gave him $50 for each of the 54 return trips he took from Ottawa to Montreal, instead of the $217 he was owed, with the senator still claiming the expenses — provided "credible and truthful" evidence.
The judge said he also believed another witness, Daniel Cote, who testified Lavigne filed travel claims on his behalf.
In total, Smith said Lavigne was guilty of defrauding the government of $10,120.50 in false travel claims.
The senator was also convicted of breach-of-trust for directing Cote to cut trees on his property in Wakefield, Que., so he could avoid the cost of hiring a contractor.
"I found that using a research assistant to cut down 60 trees on a lot owned personally by the senator, while being paid by the Senate during regular working hours, constitutes a serious and marked departure from the standard expected of a senator who holds a position of public trust," Smith said.
Although Lavigne's lawyer had tried to discredit Cote by painting him as a former employee who, once turfed, claimed he would "mount quite a dossier" against the senator, the judge said his evidence was "uncontradicted."
Lavigne never took the stand during his two-week trial in December 2009.
The Mounties began investigating Lavigne in 2006 and charged him a year later for fraud over $5,000, breach of trust and obstruction of justice.
Despite evidence that Lavigne had directed Cote to lie, saying he had cut the trees on his own free time, Smith said he felt the letters Cote had written to the Senate were intended to stop negative media coverage and to prevent a Senate inquiry.
Subsequent interactions between Cote and Lavigne leading up to the Senate investigation did not prove beyond a reasonable doubt that the senator intended to obstruct justice by suggesting Cote give false testimony, Smith said.
RCMP Supt. Stephane Bonin, the lead investigator on the case, said Friday's verdict sent a clear message.
"The court reaffirms that no one is above the law, and they'll have to answer to their acts, eventually," he said.
Conservative Senator Leo Housakos said Lavigne should do the honourable thing and step down. New Democrat MP Pat Martin said the Senate should kick him out and cut his pension.
"Taxpayers deserve better," Martin said. "It was a breach of trust and he broke faith with the Canadian people. He did a disservice to the institution and he should be fired."
No senator has ever been expelled from the Senate because of a criminal conviction, according to the upper chamber.
Former Progressive Conservative senator Eric Berntson resigned from the Senate in 2001 after being convicted of fraud. Former Progressive Conservative senator Michael Cogger resigned in 2000 after being convicted of influence peddling in the 1990s, but he was eventually given an absolute discharge.
Former Conservative senator Michael Forrestall pleaded guilty to impaired driving and was fined in 1992, but did not resign from the Senate. He died in office in 2006.
Former Liberal senator Hazen Argue was the first senator ever charged with fraud, theft and breach of trust for misuse of Senate resources in 1989. The charges were dropped in 1990 because of his battle with cancer. He died a year later.
Albert Planta, a Conservative senator, resigned from the Senate in 1935 to serve a sentence for fraudulent conversion of a client's money.
Read more: http://www.canada.com/news/Senator+found+guilty+fraud+still+receive+full+salary/4424569/story.html#ixzz1HG6rHmLH

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Pentru ca au fost crestinopati ramasi fara argumente in ceea ce sustineau si care au scris pe blog datele mele personale drept razbunare, comentariile vor fi moderate, ca sa prevenim si alte marlanii dinpartea " prietenilor" . Comentariile vor fi moderate. Forever.